Rainbow Wildlife Rescue in Little Elm, Texas - lending orphaned wildlife a helping hand
Rainbow Wildlife Rescue, Texas
 
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If you found a wild animal, please call the Dallas/Fort Worth Wildlife Coalition at (972) 234 - 9453

The Rainbow Wildlife Rescue has moved to Little Elm, TX. We do NOT accept animals for rescue but are changing venues and are focussing on education only. READ MORE HERE >>>

Wildlife Rehabilitation is not only about Cute Animals:

...but also about pain and suffering.

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PLEASE CALL THE DALLAS FORT WORTH WILDLIFE COALITION AT (972) 234-9453 IF YOU HAVE A WILDLIFE EMERGENCY AND NEED IMMEDIATE HELP!

Did you find a:
orphaned squirrel
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orphaned squirrel
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orphaned squirrel
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orphaned squirrel
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LIVE BABY RACCOON CAM
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orphaned squirrel
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* FIND A WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR *
TEXAS
TX Wildlife Rehabilitator Directory, Search by County DeDee Walker, Skunk Rescue, Wise County, TX
Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex Wildlife Rescue, Austin, Texas
Southern Wildlife Rehab, San Antonio ARC for Wildlife in East Texas
NATIONAL
U.S. States Directory Born to be Wild, Ohio
Wildlife Rehabilitators within the United States Dory & Orphans (Raccoons), North Wisconsin

Wildlife Rehabilitators by US State

Some States do not have an official list or directory of licensed wildlife rehabilitators or wildlife centers and organizations, therefore these links will point to one of the larger online directories.

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WILDLIFE ORGANIZATIONS
IWRC Opossum Society
NWF (National Wildlife Federation) Dallas/Fort Worth Wildlife Coalition

More information on orphaned urban wildlife

If you find a Baby Bird:

Many baby birds are found by people and taken in to be cared for. People believe the baby bird is rejected by its parents, lost, or can not get back into the nest. This is 99% of the time not the case.

The fatality rate of baby birds that are taken in by kind-hearted individuals is unfortunately very very high.

Many people ask if a baby bird will be rejected if a person handles the baby and the bird parents smell the human. This is just an "old wives'" tale. Baby birds are NOT rejected by their parents if a person handles them. In fact, most birds have a very poor sense of smell or are incapable of smelling at all.

Mockingbird Rescue and Rehabilitation

If you find a Baby Opossum:

DO NOT try to raise an infant opossum if you do not know what you are doing! It is also illegal in most States!

Most opossum babies end up orphaned, because their mother was hit by a car (their only real defense is to play dead...) or killed by dogs.

So PLEASE, if you care and you happen to hit an opossum with your car - accidents happen - take a minute and make sure that there are no babies on the animal, because they usually survive a lot within momma's pouch. After all, they are America's only Marsupials.

Opossum Babies
Orphaned Opossum

If you find a Baby Squirrel:

Baby squirrels sometimes fall out of a nest that has been damaged in a storm or by an aggressive male squirrel.

The squirrel may not be an orphan at all, but may have just fallen from its nest. If one squirrel has fallen from a damaged nest, others may have fallen out as well.

It is recommended that you warm the baby squirrel in your hands or by holding it close to your body and then place it at the base of the tree. Given time, the mother will return and retrieve her baby.

2 orphaned Squirrels

If you find an Baby Rabbit:

Most baby cottontails end up in human care for all the wrong reasons even though the heart of the rescuer was surely in the right spot and their intentions honorable and motives kind.

If you come across a nest of bunnies in the wild and the mother is nowhere in sight, please DO NOT disturb them!

By removing them from the nest you are greatly reducing their chances of survival.

Orphaned Cottontail Rabbits

If you find a Baby Raccoon:

If you find orphaned babies please do not try to feed them. Keep them warm and get them to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator as quickly as possible. Fed incorrectly these little ones can aspirate [inhale formula into their lungs] and die.

Even as they get a little older we still must be careful to match their mother's milk and their diet as it would be in the wild. Their systems are delicate at this age and they do not have the ability to digest many of our foods.

If you do find what you believe to be an orphaned kit, please, don't just snatch it up. We first need to make sure that it is indeed an orphan. Many babies play while mother is sleeping in a tree. Mother is nocturnal, but babies are not.

orphaned raccoon
Orphaned Raccoon

Found an orphaned animal?
Find out how to determine if it needs your help or not!

Wild animals of all shapes and sizes are born during the spring and summer months. In your own backyard, you may come across baby birds, rabbits, squirrels, opossums, and other young wildlife as they make they make their way into the world.

For many people, the pleasure of seeing these young creatures is mixed with a sense of protectiveness—of wanting to help them survive. But spotting a baby animal by himself doesn't necessarily mean he's an orphan. Many wildlife parents leave their young alone during the day, sometimes for long periods. The parent is usually nearby and quite conscious of her young. Also, keep in mind that despite their small size, many young animals are actually independent enough to fend for themselves.

How can you tell if an animal needs your help or should be left alone? Here are some general signs to look for:

  • A wild animal presented to you by a cat or dog
  • Bleeding
  • An apparent or obvious broken limb
  • A featherless or nearly featherless bird (nestling) on the ground
  • Shivering
  • Evidence of a dead parent nearby

If a wild animal exhibits any of the above signs, you should immediately call one of the following local resources for assistance. You will find listings for most of these in your telephone directory.

Remember, many animals who appear to be orphaned are not. Unless one or more of the signs mentioned above is present, do not attempt to rescue animals in any of the following circumstances:

  • A bird who is fully feathered on his body with evidence of tail feathers, hopping on the ground, but unable to fly. This is a fledgling (adolescent bird), and his parents are probably nearby.
  • A rabbit who is four inches long with open eyes and erect ears. She is independent from her mother and able to fend for herself.
  • An opossum who is nine to ten inches or longer, not including the tail. He is independent.
  • A squirrel who is nearly full sized, has a full and fluffy tail, and is able to run, jump, and climb. She is independent.

Rainbow Wildlife Rescue, Texas

The Rainbow Wildlife Rescue, INC. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization. All DONATIONS are tax-deductible!

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Rainbow Wildlife Rescue, Texas